Urban Forest Conservation Planning

CUF400: Urban Forest Conservation provides an extensive overview of urban forest conservation, planning and management and covers the following topics: a) the history of urban development, forest and forestry; b) ecology, composition, structure and functions of urban forest; c) inventory and mapping methods to support strategic urban forest planning and management; d) social, cultural, policy and land-use planning aspects defining the urban forest; e) natural, environmental and social connections between urban and rural forests; and f) establishment and maintenance of the urban forest; planning for green areas and the urban forest. The course topics examine forest characteristics and functions across urban areas of different sizes, and various land-uses within cities.

CUF401: Forest conservation planning in cultural landscapes offers a comprehensive overview of forests and forestry as part of landscape and conservation planning in developed (settled) landscapes. Students will learn how to incorporate forests in conservation and land-use planning, and how to identify priority forest conservation and restoration areas. Forests and forestry are discussed from a landscape planning perspective — as the way to retain and improve existing biodiversity elements, protect and enhance ecological functions, improve environmental benefits, enhance aesthetics, adapt to climate and other environmental changes, and inform and guide land development and land use planning.

CUF403: GIS Field and Laboratory Methods Advanced Module provides students with opportunities for hands-on development of specific skills either in the field or in a computer/ GIS lab. Depending on the student’s interest, field and GIS-lab methods may include:  a) urban forest inventory from single trees to woodlots; b) inventory information and methods of inventory data analysis; c) urban canopy and forest cover mapping; d) application of conservation planning tools.

Forestry Profession and Practice

FPP400: Forestry Profession and Practice I

This fall-term course is divided into three 3-week long modules that are inter-related but delivered independently. Each addresses broad knowledge and understanding related to core competencies required of Registered Professional Foresters in Ontario, as defined by the Canadian Forestry Accreditation Board (www.cfab.ca) and recognized as competency standards by the Ontario Professional Foresters Association (www.opfa.ca). Specifically, the FPP400 modules are:

Module 1 – Tree and Stand Dynamics
Module 2  -Forest to Landscape, Structure and Function
Module 3  – Forest Management
Professionalism and Ethics, another recognized competency, is touched upon in each module and explicitly addressed in the final (10th) week of the course.

FPP401: Forestry Profession and Practice II

This winter-term course is also divided into three 3‑week long modules that are inter-related but delivered independently.  Each addresses broad knowledge and understanding related to the remaining core competencies required of Registered Professional Foresters in Ontario (competencies that were not covered in FPP400). Specifically, the FPP401 modules are:

Module 1 – Economics and Administration of Forestry
Module 2 – Leadership Skills: Communication and Critical Reasoning
Module 3 – Information and Analysis

Professionalism and Ethics is touched upon in each module and explicitly addressed in the final (10th) week of the course.

Wood Protection and Design

WPD400: Wood in the Modern Age covers the following topics: a) basics of wood anatomy and properties, b) basics of wood chemistry, and c) an introduction to wood composites. This course will also involve discussions of how the unique anatomical aspects of wood make it an ideal building material. A final project is required, and may be tailored to reflect the student’s area of interest within wood science.

WPD401: Joinery and Construction teaches fundamental construction techniques with wood at both the micro and macro scale. Numerous video field trips and demonstrational videos will guide students through basic, medium, and advanced joinery techniques from around the globe, and how they apply to large and small scale construction. A final project is required, and may be tailored to reflect the student’s area of interest within wood science or woodworking. Woodworkers and designers who are interested in building joints at home as they are introduced in class are eligible for a discounted joinery tools box from Lee Valley Tools. (Pre-requisite: WPD 400)

WPD 402: Wood, Water, Design, and Decay focuses on the interactions of wood and water, and the effects of water on both the longevity of wood and basic design principles. Topics covered include: a) wood decay, b) wood protection (chemical and mechanical), c) the anatomical effects of water on wood, d) utilizing water in wood design, and e) spalting. A final project is required, and may be tailored to reflect the student’s area of interest within wood science.  Students taking this course to specifically work with spalting and spalted wood (and any others interested) will be given the opportunity to intern at the University of Toronto’s Applied Mycology Lab to gain experience in fungal culture preparation, inoculation, and incubation. (Pre-requisite: WPD 400)

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Course offerings

Fall 2013

  • Forestry Profession and Practice I
  • Urban Forest Conservation

Spring 2014

  • Forestry Profession and Practice II
  • Forest Conservation Planning in Cultural Landscapes

Summer 2014

  • Wood in the Modern Age
  • Joinery and Construction
  • Wood, Water, Design and Decay
  • GIS Field and Laboratory Methods Advanced Module