Following are descriptions of graduate courses offered by the Faculty of Forestry.  Forestry’s annual graduate course schedule, available at www.forestry.utoronto.ca, provides specific sessional information regarding course availability, timing and location.  Instructors should be consulted directly for additional information re: course content, prerequisites and course suitability to a student’s program.



FOR1001H:  GRADUATE SEMINAR

An overview of the current issues facing forest conservation, management and research is presented in guest seminars and student presentations.  Students will improve their writing and presentation skills as well as broaden their appreciation of forest science through written assignments and presentations.  Weekly attendance at seminars during the first fall and annual participation thereafter in a one-day seminar workshop throughout a student’s funded program is required. During the first fall session, the course includes select assignments in conjunction with students from the professional forest conservation program (MFC).

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FOR1270H: FOREST BIOMATERIAL SCIENCES – FUNDAMENTALS, APPLICATIONS AND THE NEXT FRONTIER

A key course for graduate students to gain fundamental knowledge focused on forest biomaterial sciences, to have an overview of the utilization of these renewable materials for industrial applications, and to be exposed to leading-edge sciences and technologies in fields relevant to the application of forest biomaterials. Topics will cover materials science, mechanics, wood chemistry, surface sciences, adhesives, nanotechnology and relevant advanced analytical characterizations methods. The course format will be a combination of seminars and student projects and presentations according to specific topics that are selected based on students’ interests or thesis projects.

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FOR1288H: DESIGN AND MANUFACTURING OF BIOMATERIALS

This course focuses on the manufacturing processes, properties and uses of wood and agricultural fibre based products including wood based composites, ligno-cellulosic/thermoplastic composites and structural or engineered composites.  There will be particular emphasis on the effects of adhesives and additives. Rheological behaviour of wood-furnish mats and visco-elastic behaviour of materials and final products.

  • Course instructor: M. Sain
  • Exclusion: FOR423H1/FOR424H1

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FOR1294H: BIOENERGY AND BIOREFINERY TECHNOLOGY

This course focuses on technological advances and approaches in deriving biofuels and chemical feedstocks from forest and other biomass.  Fundamental chemical attributes of biomass, as they affect the fuel value and potential for deriving liquid, solid and gaseous fuels from the biomass will be discussed.  Processing options for valuable chemicals for other applications will also be discussed. Emphasis will also be placed on the economics and processing efficiencies of these conversion technologies.

  • Course instructor: S. Krigstin
  • Exclusion: FOR410H1/FOR425H1

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FOR1412H: NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 1


FOR1413H: NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 2

Directed studies (master’s level) course dealing with selected aspects of natural resource management by arrangement between student and individual staff member.  A maximum of one directed studies course taken with a student’s supervisor can be credited toward meeting departmental degree program requirements.

  • Course instructor:  Staff.
  • Note:  Prior written agreement of staff member is required to register for course (a “Request for Individual Reading and/or Research Course” form available from Faculty Office).

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FOR1416H: FOREST FIRE DANGER RATING

The assessment of forest fire danger is a critical aspect of forest fire management.  We will review the physical, mathematical and statistical aspects of models used for forest fire danger rating in Canada, including fuel moisture, fire occurrence and fire behaviour models and will examine how these models have been developed based on field and laboratory experimentation and statistical modelling techniques. Through lectures and assignments we will examine the assumptions underlying these models and their use, and develop an understanding of how to modify or develop new models to fit new forest types or management needs.

  • Course instructor: M. Wotton
  • Exclusion: FOR419H1

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FOR1575H: URBAN FOREST CONSERVATION

Course objective:  to provide background on the many challenges facing those charged with the responsibility of managing urban forest ecosystems.  A major theme will be the need to address these challenges within the context of planning and legislative processes.  Topics:  the historical role of tree and green spaces in urban environments; socio-economic and environmental benefits; urban forests and the law; stresses acting on trees in the urban environment and potential remedial measures.

  • Course instructor: L. Seehausen
  • Exclusion: FOR416H1/FOR421H1

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FOR1585H: URBAN FOREST CONSERVATION FIELD CAMP

The Urban Forest Conservation Field Camp will consist of five days examining urban forestry issues in the GTA and 5-7 additional days visiting municipalities in southern and eastern Ontario, Quebec as well as the northern USA. Topics will include urban forest inventories, nursery production, arboricultural techniques, urban woodland management, urban forest health, urban forest administration, urban dendrology and urban forestry research. Note: Summer session course/activity.

  • NOTE: Summer session course/activity
  • Course instructor: TBA
  • Exclusion: FOR418H1

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JFG1610H: SUSTAINABLE FOREST MANAGEMENT & CERTIFICATION

The field and practice of sustainable forest management and certification are rapidly evolving. This course is designed to provide an overview of sustainable forest management policies and programs from a provincial, national and international perspective. Through the implementation of such policies and programs, various outcomes should be achieved (ecological sustainability, biodiversity conservation, economic stability and community longevity). Historical perspectives, current initiatives and future opportunities are reviewed. The successes achieved by the implementation of such a program are measured through the use of criteria and indicators and certification processes. The ISO, SFI, the Canadian Standards Association, the Forest Stewardship Council and other certification processes are studied.

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FOR1900H:  ADVANCED TOPICS IN FORESTRY 1


FOR1901H:  ADVANCED TOPICS IN FORESTRY 2

A directed studies and/or research course at the advanced (Ph.D.) level by arrangement between student and individual staff member.  A maximum of one directed studies course taken with a student’s supervisor can be credited toward meeting departmental degree program requirements.

  • Course instructor: Staff.
  • Note: Prior written agreement of staff member is required to register (using a “Request for Individual Reading and/or Research Course” form available from Faculty office).

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FOR3000H:  CURRENT ISSUES IN FOREST CONSERVATION

Major approaches and challenges facing effective conservation of the world’s forests are addressed through critical analysis of Canadian and international forest management and practices, including global land use conflicts within inhabited and pristine landscapes, aboriginal communities and the forest industry. Guest lectures and professionally-based assignments are used to investigate ENGO and governmental perspectives in topical areas including climate change, carbon sequestration, endangered species legislation, value-added wood product technology, and biomolecular advances.

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FOR3001H:  BIODIVERSITY OF FOREST ORGANISMS

Introduction to systematics, identification and classification of plants and animals comprising the main taxonomic groups of forest organisms:  trees, fungi, bryophytes, lichens, ferns, conifers and other Gymnosperms, Angiosperms, insects, other arthropods, amphibia, reptiles, birds and mammals.  Community ecology, diversity and function in relation to forest management planning are addressed through field trips, lectures & a team-based consultant report.  The course is composed of a 8-day field camp at the beginning of term, followed by lectures and field trips covering topics in biodiversity of forested landscapes and ecosystems.

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FOR3002H:  APPLIED FOREST ECOLOGY AND SILVICULTURE

An examination of the natural processes that determine the structure and function of forest ecosystems at the tree, stand and landscape scale, and approaches to integrating ecological theory in forest management practice.  Topics include silvics and functional ecology of tree species, forest succession, soils and biogeochemical cycles, stand dynamics, growth and yield modelling, silvicultural systems and forest conservation ecology.  The emphasis will be on northern temperate forests with select examples from other regions.  Field and laboratory exercises will provide practical experience in forest biometrics and inventory, silvicultural experimental design, stand management prescriptions and the use of forest landscape databases and models.

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FOR3003H:  ECONOMICS OF FOREST ECOSYSTEMS

The focus of the course is to build theoretical foundations of economic issues related to forest ecosystems and to develop an understanding of their applications to real life situations of forest conservation. The different economic concepts related to forest ecosystems are taught in a three-step process – theory, practice, and application. First, some basic concepts of economics, such as consumer choice, firm behavior, and competitive markets are introduced. The second part of the course is organized in five units – one unit each on welfare theory, rent theory, cost-benefit analysis, forest rotation, and international trade of forest products.

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FOR3004H:  FOREST MANAGEMENT DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEMS

The use of analytical methods and mathematical modelling in the planning for sustainable management of forests and integration of the ecological, economic and social issues related to forest management.  Introduction of various decision-making techniques such as linear programming, computer simulation and geographic information systems.

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FOR3005H:  STRESSES IN THE FOREST ENVIRONMENT

The natural functioning of forest systems with emphasis on the disruption caused by stress factors in tree and forest development.  Classification and identification of important stresses including pollution, forest insects, diseases and competing vegetation.  The role of environmental factors that influence forest health will be considered at the level of the cell, tree and stand.  Students will apply the principles and techniques of managing disturbed forests to both urban and general forest situations.  An integrated approach to sustaining forest health will be taken through exposure to strategies of decision-making in appropriate laboratory and project assignments.

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FOR3006H:  CASE STUDY ANALYSIS IN FOREST MANAGEMENT

Case Study Analysis in Forest Management:  The course focuses on developing skills in integrating forest management related knowledge from natural and social sciences , and offers
opportunities, through discussion of case  studies,  to learn  applications of knowledge from natural and social sciences to the solution of  real-life multi-dimensional forest management problems. Concepts related to integration science and case study analysis are introduced and many case studies, related to forest conservation, forests for industrial production, forestry NGOs, international forestry, trade of forest products, wildlife management, public participation, and Aboriginal forestry are discussed.

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FOR3007H:  INTERNSHIP IN FOREST CONSERVATION

A guided research practical internship to take place in the summer following the first winter session to provide students with experience in applying concepts, principles and methods acquired in formal courses to the solution of practical forest management problems.  Students, individually or in groups, will carry out detailed analyses of practical problems in forest conservation at a field location in Canada or abroad.  The internship will include interaction with forest managers and individuals or groups involved in forest-related issues.  The results of the internship will be used in the subsequent fall semester to prepare practical policy recommendations which will be incorporated in a research paper, consulting report or management plan (see FOR3008F).  CR/NCR course.
Note:  Summer session course/activity.

  • NOTE: Summer session course/activity
  • Course coordinator: S. Krigstin

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FOR3008H:  CAPSTONE PROJECT IN FOREST CONSERVATION

This course will involve analysing information and preparing formal reports based on the summer internship, in consultation with individual faculty supervisors.  Students will deliver brief seminar presentations on their work, and there will be an oral defence of the final paper.

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FOR3009H:  FOREST CONSERVATION BIOLOGY

This course provides students with an understanding of the distribution and ecology of the world’s major forested ecosystems and a broad grasp of major conservation biology issues in each.  A summary of global physical geography and ecosystem classification in the opening weeks is followed by lectures, presentations, and discussions on key conservation biology issues organized into three modules: tropical forests, subtropical forests, and temperate forests.  Topics include the evolution of concepts of forest conservation, sustainable forestry and ecosystem conservation; and the effectiveness of regulatory approaches and management practices in different societies, regions, and nations.

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FOR3010H:  SOCIETY AND FOREST CONSERVATION

The course focuses on social and political dimensions of human-forest interactions and theoretical approaches to study these interactions. It explores the social practices, institutions and regimes of power and knowledge in shaping human-forest relations. Taking a political ecology approach, the course examines how power, knowledge, culture and nature intersect and shape each other; and explore issues of equity and justice in different forest governance contexts. The course explores forest governance challenges in different parts of the world, including in Canada. The course will be run as a seminar, with student-led activities, research and presentations.

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FOR3011H:  INTERNATIONAL FOREST CONSERVATION FIELD CAMP

An intensive two-week field course based at international field stations will take place at the beginning of the summer term following the first academic session of the program.  (See “Field Work Note” under “Introduction”.)  The application of theoretical principles acquired in academic core courses to practical projects in community forestry and forest conservation.  The course will involve students in group research and assessment, and will include cooperation with local training and research institutes, conservation projects and non-government organizations.  A number of international course locations will be used.  CR/NCR course.

  • Course coordinators: S.C. Thomas / F. Pinto
  • Note: Summer session course/activity.

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FOR3012H: ANALYTICAL METHODS IN FORESTRY

A series of modules designed to provide an introduction to practical methods in basic statistics, geographic information systems (GIS), conflict resolution and social sciences.  Students will be required to complete at least three of four modules.

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